Bonsai Ginseng Ficus. Start your own rainforest!


bonsai ginseng ficus





Welcome to our Bonsai Ginseng Ficus information!



The stunning Ginseng Ficus, otherwise known as a Banyan Fig, is a fantastic addition to a Bonsai collection or as a first Bonsai.

Why is is a great first Bonsai? Well, the Ginseng Ficus is considered to be one of the easiest Bonsai trees to grow. Perfect for beginners!

Native to South-East Asia, the Bonsai Ginseng Ficus is a slow-growing evergreen plant, belonging to the Fig family. It looks proud and intricate in the wild and it is totally possible to achieve the same effect at home.

The Bonsai Ginseng Ficus is considered to be incredibly interesting, mainly due to it's complex and aesthetically pleasing root system. Their roots appear above ground as a warping, wrapping bunch of fingers.

The leaves are oval-shaped and can be a very vivid green during the growing season. It is entirely normal for dead leaves to drop during Winter and Autumn.

The most favoured styles for the Bonsai Ginseng Ficus is Root-Over-Rock and Exposed Roots, allowing viewing of the wonderful root system.

Remember, before continuing, have a look at our Care Guide and make a checklist!



Now onto the important stuff!




Soil, Lighting & Watering

• The Bonsai Ginseng Ficus does not enjoy sitting in water, so a well-draining soil is required. You would be well informed to use a soil mix with a 1/3 grit content. They are not very fussy with soil types so a basic Bonsai mix will suffice.

• Your Ginseng Ficus will enjoy direct sunlight where possible. If you have the Ficus inside a great deal, place your tree near a window where it can recieve enough sun. It can pay to rotate the tree so it recieves equal amounts. If you live in areas such as, for example; Alaska, with periods of no sun, 24 hour darkness etc, the Ginseng Ficus will not grow unless you have growing lights!

• The Ginseng Ficus is native to rainforests and tropical climates. In maintaining a watering regime, ensure that you water once a day, but, not in a direct 'hose-to-soil' manner.

• Your Ginseng Ficus will perform better if it feels at home. Misting rain is common in rainforests so try to replicate this yourself! Use a spray bottle and mist the plant daily until the soil is wet.

• Do not allow your Ficus to dry out! They can handle overwatering on occasions but do not react well to drought!

• To make life easier, you can invest in a humidity tray that will maintain regular misting and maintain it's natural environment. Inside an aquarium, this can look quite spectacular!




Feeding

• To feed your Bonsai Ginseng Ficus you will need to use a low-nitrogen fertiliser, easily attained from garden centres.

• Feed throughout the growing season (Spring), aim for once a week. For more information on Seasonal care click here!




Repotting

• You would be best off aiming to repot your Ginseng Ficus yearly. Due to the roots being quite important for the tree's aesthetics you want to ensure they are vigorous and healthy!

• Repot at the beginning of Spring!

• For more information on potting click here




Wiring & Pruning

• Before Spring (growing season), you will need to pinch off around a third of all growth. This will leave areas of new growth that you will have to be vigilant and pinch off as it occurs. Due to the Ginseng Ficus being a small and dainty tree, too much foliage will destroy it's appeal.

• When branches become uncontrollable, use a dull pruning implement as opposed to sharp to avoid sap bleeding. Prune branches and leave around one third.

• Depending on your vision for your Bonsai Ginseng Ficus, wiring is not always necessary. Many Bonsai artists simply leave their Ginseng Ficus to do 'it's own thing'. However, if you do want to specifically shape yours, observe our wiring guide.

• You may need raffia (branch protection) to save your branches from being eaten away by wire.

• Wire before the growing season.

Own this Ficus, exactly as pictured below! To buy it just click the photo!

Ginseng Ficus  (Ficus Retusa)



Leave Bonsai Ginseng Ficus and head back to Bonsai Trees Guide!